Asides

Hitting branches

On Sunday, my mono-scene class had its last show (at the Magnet, Level 4 and up get four shows, ‘cos you get to be a better performer by performing). It wasn’t great. When our instructor gave us notes afterwards, one of my classmates started apologizing, and the instructor broke to give us a quick pep talk instead:

Mistakes are part of this. We all want to be perfect improvisers, and we will NEVER be perfect improvisers, none of us. No matter how long you do it, you will ALWAYS be messing up. We’re all trying to climb this impossibly tall unclimbable tree, and all we can do is try to hit a few branches on the way down so we don’t land quite so badly. That’s all improv training is, is learning how to hit branches during our inevitable fall.

Shake it off

Lately I’ve realized that a lot of really good improvisers shake onstage. I noticed a house-team guy do it once, and now I’ve started to specifically look for it. I don’t bring it up to be cruel; rather, it’s comforting to find out that I’m not alone in being scared as hell onstage, and comforting that you can still be amazing even if you are scared as hell.

Lemme in!

…I get progressively more freaked out the more people I have to play with at once.

Monoscenes, by definition, require interacting with a large group of people at once, which I’m starting to think automatically sets off my introversion/ social anxiety/ agoraphobia/ fear, and renders me useless for improv.

– Me, 7-23-14

 

I continue to have a lot of trouble with group scenes. So here are tips from a Real Improv Instructor on how to insert yourself into the group dialogue:

 

  • Verbally agree with/ repeat what’s being said— “yeah, yeah, bandanas, right!”— Because then you’re immediately a participant in the scene, not an observer.
  • Don’t be so polite! Give and take focus— If you do find a line, and you start to say it, and someone else talks over you, DON’T LET ‘EM if it’s not their turn. Also try to be conscious if you’re bulldozing the scene (‘cos that’s just as bad).

 

There may be more, but that’s all I can remember that Real Improv Instructor told us.

Tell the mountains

I just noticed that I’m in love with improv right now.

I get on stage, and I do a shitty job, and I walk off giggling and itching to get back up there and give it another go. That was fun, but I coulda done that one thing better, so let’s have a do-over, I’ll get it right this time, yeahhhh!

This has not always been my attitude. In retrospect, I think I have DCM16 and autumn hypomania to thank. But yeah, this is what I’ve been striving for for the past year.

 

So.

Uh.

…Welp, guess we can shut the doors on this blog of improv angst. *wipes off hands and rides into the sunset*

 

(Don’t worry, we’ll return soon with a brand new season of fear-borne existential crises! Stay tuned.)